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Oldschoolbiketen

Jockstrap Fan
What does anything know about the Johnson and Johnson line of jockstraps? I have a Coach w/2 1/2" waistband and I love it! I would like to learn more about the history of the brand.
 

JSMike

Jockstrap Fan
The oldest reference I have is a 1919 article in the Red Cross Messenger, that stated that US Army athletes, traveling to France to compete in the Inter-allied games, wore "a No. 202 Johnson & Johnson Athletic Supporter, or Jock Strap, with pure silk knit sack." Boys' Life magazine carried ads for J&J supporters in the 1940s. Life magazine also carried ads in the 1940s. In the 1940s and 1950, J&J jocks were endorsed by the New York Yankees.
 

Jockp

Jockstrap Fan
Most jockstraps were sold at the major department stores
I can remember buying jocks at Target of all places
I would always go to a checkout that had a guy to get a reaction
 

Jockp

Jockstrap Fan
And I maybe mistaken but the Protex jock was made by Johnson and Johnson
Jocks were really common in the 70’s and 80’s
Lots of guys wore jocks at the gym back then
But times changed here like the US I suppose but interestingly they seemed to be coming back
And Aussiebum are now making a Classic Jock
 

NavyJock

Jockstrap Fan
I got a J&J jock in minnesota years after I think they stopped making them. It was okay, but nothing to write home about. BIKE any day for me.
 

BULGEHOUND

Jockstrap Fan
Johnson & Johnson jockstraps were popular at drug stores c 1964. They were often sold behind a glass counter. Athens, GA.
The «real» PROTEX was not J&J but made in Canada by the Guelph Elastic Hosiery Company. They had numerous models. Most had a tall centre panel above the pouch ( sometimes of knit mesh) that for short-waisted guys like me made the waistband ride up almost to my lower ribs. Some of the older models were quite «neat» with ample but form-fitting pouches and 2-inch waistbands. Many Canadian basketball players wore the «COLLEGIATE» model because its low rise didn't show when wearing the extremely brief (& often SKIN-TIGHT!) shorts that were de rigueur in the 50s and 60s. There was the VARSITY (with 3" hi-rise waistband); the RC#1 and RC#2; and the O'KEE cup-holder jock with soft flannel inner liner and a cast Magnesium cup with large «ventilation» holes and felt binding on the edges. Then there was the «Nylon Pouch» which was, for a time, the only jock we could find in my city. It was an RC#1 (3' band low-rise) but with a TINY pouch made of some sort of semi-plastic mesh with SHARP edges which might have appealed to Ms (of S&M) but worn in gym class left bleeding scratches after only a few minutes of activity. The 3"waistbands (with trademark multiple navy blue stripes) of all Protex jocks were uniformly thick and soft and VERY comfortable if you had flat abs but rolled uncomfortably if there was even a hint of flab down there.

RE J&J, I would occasionally see older cotton J&J jocks and in the hockey locker room (1965) spotted a J&J «All Nylon» being worn under a huge Cooper «Defenseman's Cup». The J&J All Nylon was SLEEK and SEXY but very hard (ptp!] to find and disappeared from the market far too soon. I LOVED the several I was able to get, and wore my last one until it almost disintegrated. The Bike #10s, IF we could find any, were made of flimsy, unbleached cotton, oversized, and would stretch & shrink in all the wrong directions. Occasionally I would spot guys who had gone to school in the USA sporting dazzling WHITE #10s of much better material and much better fit. (to be continued)
 

BULGEHOUND

Jockstrap Fan
I got a J&J jock in minnesota years after I think they stopped making them. It was okay, but nothing to write home about. BIKE any day for me.
For a time, BIKE made some awesome jocks with thick, soft, COMFORTABLE waistbands and accurate sizing. The current GREY Bike models have a sleazy, sharp-edged wiastbamd, sad-sack pouches, and the XXL is really a MED. OH for the days of the «propfessional» Bike jocks — pushed off the market by bean-counters, ad-sales idiots, and the sadistic ball-0crushers who push «compression shorts» which do a superb job of compressing one's jewels and then shredding them with unforgiving seams.
 

Jockp

Jockstrap Fan
The «real» PROTEX was not J&J but made in Canada by the Guelph Elastic Hosiery Company. They had numerous models. Most had a tall centre panel above the pouch ( sometimes of knit mesh) that for short-waisted guys like me made the waistband ride up almost to my lower ribs. Some of the older models were quite «neat» with ample but form-fitting pouches and 2-inch waistbands. Many Canadian basketball players wore the «COLLEGIATE» model because its low rise didn't show when wearing the extremely brief (& often SKIN-TIGHT!) shorts that were de rigueur in the 50s and 60s. There was the VARSITY (with 3" hi-rise waistband); the RC#1 and RC#2; and the O'KEE cup-holder jock with soft flannel inner liner and a cast Magnesium cup with large «ventilation» holes and felt binding on the edges. Then there was the «Nylon Pouch» which was, for a time, the only jock we could find in my city. It was an RC#1 (3' band low-rise) but with a TINY pouch made of some sort of semi-plastic mesh with SHARP edges which might have appealed to Ms (of S&M) but worn in gym class left bleeding scratches after only a few minutes of activity. The 3"waistbands (with trademark multiple navy blue stripes) of all Protex jocks were uniformly thick and soft and VERY comfortable if you had flat abs but rolled uncomfortably if there was even a hint of flab down there.

RE J&J, I would occasionally see older cotton J&J jocks and in the hockey locker room (1965) spotted a J&J «All Nylon» being worn under a huge Cooper «Defenseman's Cup». The J&J All Nylon was SLEEK and SEXY but very hard (ptp!] to find and disappeared from the market far too soon. I LOVED the several I was able to get, and wore my last one until it almost disintegrated. The Bike #10s, IF we could find any, were made of flimsy, unbleached cotton, oversized, and would stretch & shrink in all the wrong directions. Occasionally I would spot guys who had gone to school in the USA sporting dazzling WHITE #10s of much better material and much better fit. (to be continued)
The «real» PROTEX was not J&J but made in Canada by the Guelph Elastic Hosiery Company. They had numerous models. Most had a tall centre panel above the pouch ( sometimes of knit mesh) that for short-waisted guys like me made the waistband ride up almost to my lower ribs. Some of the older models were quite «neat» with ample but form-fitting pouches and 2-inch waistbands. Many Canadian basketball players wore the «COLLEGIATE» model because its low rise didn't show when wearing the extremely brief (& often SKIN-TIGHT!) shorts that were de rigueur in the 50s and 60s. There was the VARSITY (with 3" hi-rise waistband); the RC#1 and RC#2; and the O'KEE cup-holder jock with soft flannel inner liner and a cast Magnesium cup with large «ventilation» holes and felt binding on the edges. Then there was the «Nylon Pouch» which was, for a time, the only jock we could find in my city. It was an RC#1 (3' band low-rise) but with a TINY pouch made of some sort of semi-plastic mesh with SHARP edges which might have appealed to Ms (of S&M) but worn in gym class left bleeding scratches after only a few minutes of activity. The 3"waistbands (with trademark multiple navy blue stripes) of all Protex jocks were uniformly thick and soft and VERY comfortable if you had flat abs but rolled uncomfortably if there was even a hint of flab down there.

RE J&J, I would occasionally see older cotton J&J jocks and in the hockey locker room (1965) spotted a J&J «All Nylon» being worn under a huge Cooper «Defenseman's Cup». The J&J All Nylon was SLEEK and SEXY but very hard (ptp!] to find and disappeared from the market far too soon. I LOVED the several I was able to get, and wore my last one until it almost disintegrated. The Bike #10s, IF we could find any, were made of flimsy, unbleached cotton, oversized, and would stretch & shrink in all the wrong directions. Occasionally I would spot guys who had gone to school in the USA sporting dazzling WHITE #10s of much better material and much better fit. (to be continued)
Yes that’s the jock
How amazing
I had an RC 1
Then I bought the jock with the panel with the butt straps coming around to the front panel
Quite possibly the most comfortable jockstrap I’ve ever worn
Those Protex jockstraps were the first jocks I officially bought myself
I can still remember the old sales
 

Jockp

Jockstrap Fan
I should add I bought those jockstraps in the early 70’s
Since then I’ve worn different brands but my preference is still Bike jocks
Great to see them being made again
 
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